How Do I Keep My Grout Clean?

Why does grout discolour and become dirty?

Most grout used in domestic situations such as bathrooms and kitchens is water-resistant and not water proof. This means that while your tiles may repel moisture your grout can often absorb it. When mopping dirt off the surface of tiles it is the moisture carrying dirt particles that absorbs into the grout causing it to discolour. In wet areas such as showers or wet rooms it is possible to get a build up of soaps, moisture and sebum within grouting. If not cleaned properly this will stay within the grout and encourage mould spores and mildew to grow.

Approaches to cleaning grout

There are many ways that people choose to tackle issues of mould growth, mildew and dirty grout between wall, floor and surface tiles. Household chlorine based bleach; baking soda and vinegar are three common approaches.

While these methods can prove effective for cleaning glazed ceramic tiles, there are a number of issues that can make them inappropriate for use with natural stone and tiles. General-purpose chlorine bleach cleaners can damage the stone or the protective sealer applied to the surface. Do not use products that contain lemon, vinegar or other acids on acid-sensitive stones such as limestone, marble and terrazzo as these may etch the stone surface and damage the polish or sealer.

Do not use scouring powders or creams; these products contain abrasives that may scratch the surface. This can also apply to glazed tiles. Hydrogen peroxide cleaners can also be mildly corrosive. They give short-term cleaning benefits with limited effectiveness on fungal spores, making them poor at preventing re contamination. Baking soda is a great option with fewer disadvantages. However it can often prove ineffective in tackling stubborn stains and often requires excessive scrubbing to deliver results. In all cases the use of highly abrasive cleaning tools such as wire wool should be avoided, as these will scratch the surface. Ensure you use an appropriate abrasive cleaning pad designed for natural stone.

Tips for cleaning grout between tiles

To clean dirty grouting on floors and walls we recommend the use of LTP Grimex.


An intensive grease and grime cleaner suitable for intensive cleaning of grout between glazed ceramic or porcelain tiles or unglazed natural stone. LTP Grimex is also excellent for renovating old quarry tiles, terracotta, slate, stone, marble and stone fireplaces.

Please note: LTP Grimex will not damage natural stone surfaces if used correctly. It does however breakdown protective layers of sealer and waxes on the surface. It is therefore recommended that the product be tested on a small inconspicuous area before general application. Natural stone tiles should also be resealed after use. Glazed porcelain and ceramic tiles are not affected. Please contact our technical helpline for further advice and assistance.

Grout cleaning tips for mould growth and mildew

Grout is porous and absorbs water, especially in humid places like the bathroom. As a result, fungi such as mildew can often be found growing between tiles, in the grout. Removing unsightly mould growth and mildew stains can prove a difficult challenge. 


Formulated to cling to grout and remove mould spores, fungus, algae and moss from grouting, silicone seals and other damp places. LTP Mouldex has antibacterial properties that help to prevent re-growth. LTP Mouldex a 500ml trigger spray ideal for use on bathroom and kitchen wall tiles but can also be used to tackle small areas of floor grout.

When Grout Cleaning Tips Don’t Work

If all your grout cleaning attempts fail, it is time to remove the grout. This doesn’t automatically mean redoing the entire grouted area. If the stain only affects a small area, try removing just the small section affected by the mould growth or stain. For a shallow stain, use a hand-held rotary tool or mini sander to remove just the top layer of the grout. Take care not to damage your tiles. Re-seal the grout to give future protection. A deeper stain means more of the material will need removing. Removing such a stain may need a fresh coat of grout altogether.

The most important tip of all – Protect your grout!

Whether tackling mould growth, mildew, stubborn stains or ingrained grime, grout cleaning is not the most pleasant housekeeping job to perform. Most people avoid it as long as possible, which exacerbates the problem.

So the very best tip we can give is to make sure that you protect you grout and stone surfaces when they are installed and after intensive cleaning. Maintain your tile and stone surfaces regularly. Always make sure that you top up the protection to your grout after cleaning.

LTP Grout Protection

LTP offer two grout protection options:


Recommend for sealing newly laid grout. LTP Grout Protector is a colourless barrier suitable for use in kitchens and bathrooms. Helps protect absorbent, porous grout joints from water, dirt, oil, grease, sebum and limescale. Ideal for use on newly laid glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles where in normal conditions unprotected grout joints quickly become dirty. This product is also ideal for sealing grout between natural stone tiles that have been sealed prior to being laid.


This product is an easy use as a top-up coat. Helps protect natural stone and all other types of masonry surface. Provides a colourless barrier that helps to protect porous wall and floor grout joints from penetration by water, dirt, oil, grease and limescale. Treated surfaces are easier to keep clean and repel dirt and grime. Ideal for use in wet rooms and shower enclosures as a top up protection for grout after intensive cleaning.


A Collection Of Images From Finished Projects.

Terracotta Hand made 30x30

Terracotta Hand made 30×30

Terracotta Hand made 30x30

Terracotta Hand made 30×30





Dinning Room Floor 3 SAMSUNG TECHWIN DIGIMAX-340 Around Swimming Pool 2 Wet Room Walls & Floors 1 wet room 1 Kitchen Diner Floor 1

Olive Flagstone

Olive Limestone Flagstone



Brazilian Black Slate

Brazilian Black Slate

Rustic Multi Slate

Rustic Multi Slate

Rustic Multi Slate

Rustic Multi Slate

Rustic Multi Slate

Rustic Multi Slate







canamia secoyva (1) IMG_20140319_200115


DSC_1413 DSC_1392 DSC_1390 DSC_1388


For More Images Please Visit Our Facebook Page Wellington-Tile-Company Or Our Twitter Page @Wellytile

What Colour Grout Should I Use?

Deciding what grout colour to use is purely a personal preference, but there are a few hints and advice we have accumulated over the years, on how to achieve the look your after.






The above images show the effects of different grout colours, the picture on the left has a very light grout colour and frames the tiles. Whereas the image on the right has grout more to the colour of the tiles and so blends in with the tiles. Grouting is an important part of the decision process. 

If you wish for the tiles to stand out and be “framed” then go for a contrasting colour, but be careful as sometimes all you will see is the grout and not the other way around, try with some grout swatches first, or have a look in our showroom, as we have nearly all the tiles on display with grouting to show the different choices available.

jose sempra 15x30





Another important aspect of tiling is choice of grout size, often wrong grout width choice can ruin the look of a tiled area. Have a go with a few tiles on the floor, put a 3mm joint between them and have a look, keep going until you find the space you prefer the most.

In our showroom you will see many displays of tiles with various grout widths and our fully trained staff will be more than willing to advice you on the correct choice to give you your required look.

Or call us on 01823 667242 

Alternatively visit Our website

Is My Floor Suitable For Underfloor Heating?

Yes, Underfloor heating can be installed under just about any floor covering.


Underfloor heating is simply a heating system installed underneath, rather than above the flooring, providing radiant heat to the room. Once installed electric underfloor heating will perform significantly better than radiators. If you are considering installing underfloor heating in your home, but are unsure as to whether it is really worth your while, take a look at the many advantages below:

Comfortable temperature 

The heat given off by underfloor heating makes for a much more comfortable depth of warmth in the home. The heat is distributed closer to the bottom of the room than the top, so all of the heat given off is felt.

Energy efficiency                                                                insulation

In general, less heat is lost via ventilation when an underfloor heating system is used. This means rooms stay warmer, improving energy efficiency.

It is also the case that underfloor heating uses less energy, again improving energy efficiency and, lowering household energy bills.

Room control

With underfloor heating, it is possible to control the temperature of each room individually, from a central location. This means that people who like their bedroom to be cooler than their living room, for example, can easily adjust their system to their preference.

Interior design

Finally, an often overlooked benefit of underfloor heating is the fact that there are no bulky radiators cluttering up the room, so homeowners are freer to make the best use of their space.

Sizes available

They are supplied in outputs of 100w, 150W or 200W per square metre and come in a large range of sizes allowing you to select the perfect underfloor heating system whatever your room dimensions. For the prices of the 100W, 150W and the 200W please call 01823 667242 or email us at

In normal circumstances they do not add any build height to your tiled floor as they are so thin that they are contained within the tile adhesive layer.



DT DISPLAY final look

Customers in our showroom often ask “Can I tile myself or do I need to employ a tiler?” 

If you have time, patience & some DIY skills then tiling is a job which can be done by the customer.need to employ a tiler?”

Listed below are some helpful hints to DIY tile fitting.

Planning and preparation is key.

First make sure you know your floor substrate and the correct preparation required prior to tiling.

All surfaces, including existing tiles, must be clean, firm, dry, free from dust, dirt, oil and grease, and strong enough to support the weight of the tiles and the adhesive. When tiling on to timber floors the surface should be prepared to provide a rigid and secure base without any deflection.

Some Questions to ask

Q:What is my floor substrate?

A: Useful link: ( 

Q:Is it suitable to tile straight on to?

A: Most substrates can be tiled onto but will need different preparations (

Q:Can I tile on top of existing tiles?

A: Yes provided they are soundly fitted to the floor and you prepare the (surface correctly

Q:Can I have underfloor heating under tiles?

A: Underfloor heating system are available to go under most floor surfaces for further details email:


Q:How many square metres do I require?

A: By measuring the room dimensions and sending them to we will calculate your requirements and will include a suggested 10% cutting allowance or try our tile calculator

Q:Will I need expansion joints?

A:normally around the edge of the room it is good practice. (

Q:What tools will I need

A: Notched Trowel, Grout Float, Hydro Sponge, Spacers,  Cutter, and for natural stone tiles additional: Cleaning & sealing kits 

Now you are ready make sure you have the correct tiles,tools, adhesive and grout ready for your job.


Find the centre point of the room and section into quarters.

Work one quarter at a time, if possible lay your tiles out without adhesive first to check the finished effect and to arrange the cuts at the edge of the room.

You would normally lay from different boxes to avoid shade variation rather than one box at a time.

Spread the adhesive evenly using a notch trowel or spreader. Laying Adhesive still(08-01-2014 15-12) JPEGPlace the tile in position, giving it a slight twist to bed in to the adhesive. Continue laying your tiles leaving a grout joint of your choice (NEVER butt joint). 

Helpful tip: spread a thin layer of adhesive on the back of the tiles as well to achieve perfect bond.

Check from time to time that your tiles are level (by using a spirit level) and that there are no hollows under the tiles.

Lay the quarters until all that is left are the cuts around the Tiling still 2 (08-01-2014 14-54) JPEGedges of the room.

Clean the tiles regularly to avoid adhesive remaining on the tiles and remove excess adhesive in the joints.

It is recommend to leave the tiles for 24 hours before cutting and laying the edge tiles.


Allow the adhesive to dry (cure) before grouting.

If the tiles require sealing such as natural stone, terracottapolished porcelain & slate then applying 1st coat of sealer before grouting- this not only helps ensure the grout does not stain the tile, but it also helps with the cleaning of the excess grout.

Grouting still 2 (08-01-2014 15-01) JPEG

Using your grout float apply enough grout as you can effectively work with.

Press the grout into the joints (in a diagonal direction) to an even level with the tile. Remove the excess from the tile with the grout float.

Washing Grout Still (08-01-2014 15-23) JPEG

Wait for the grout to stiffen then using a damp sponge work across the joints being careful not to drag the grout out of the joints. Clean as you work checking the grout joints are full and smoothly finished.

Useful link ( 

Leave for the entire floor to cure. Grout residue (hazing) can be removed with LTP Grout St Remover (on the appropriate tiles).


The foregoing advice, whilst given in good faith and from experience gained in various installation situations is for guidance purposes only. If in doubt at any stage of floor laying, experiment before proceeding further or seek further advice. Neither the supplier nor the manufacturers will be liable for any dissatisfaction resulting from these instructions nor will they in any circumstances accept responsibility for any damaged or incorrect tiles once they have been fixed.



Are you just about to buy Wall or Floor Tiles ? Confused about the different types of Glazed Ceramic Tiles and Glazed Porcelain?

Maybe the below answers to some of the  most frequently asked questions will help you make up your mind …………

Floor Tiles

Whats the difference between a glazed ceramic tile and glazed porcelain tile?

The difference is in the biscuit, or base of the tile. A ceramic biscuit is normally made from red clay which is then glazed and fired. A porcelain biscuit is made from much finer grained clay which is then pressed under very high pressure; this makes it very hard and impervious to water. As a result porcelain tiles are generally frost proof and stronger than a ceramic.

Ceramic tiles tend to be cheaper and easier to cut and providing you have a high glaze grade (PEI rating 4 or 5) are extremely durable for flooring, though not recommended for outside.

Glazed tiles

Glazed tiles are painted with a glass like liquid and then fired to produce a sheen on the surface to give the tile a different characteristic. The liquid glass or glaze is usually baked into the surface of the clay at very high temperatures over 1500 F. Not only are glazed tiles easier to keep clean but they also allow manufacturers to produce an unlimited assortment of colors, hues, and designs..

There are essentially two types of glazed ceramic tiles:

Single-Glaze Tiles
To produce single glazes, the glaze coating is applied directly to the tile before it is fired. Single-glazed tiles offer more vivid colors and are typically more durable than double-glazed and unglazed tiles, making them more suitable for floors.

Double-Glaze Tiles
Double glazes are produced by applying a glaze coat to tiles that have already been fired, then firing the tiles a second time. Double glazes show patterns better than single glazes, but are somewhat less durable, making them more suitable for lighter-traffic floors and walls.

How do you know which PEI Strength rating a glazed floor tile is?

We are often asked this question.  It is impossible to tell the PEI Grading just from looking at the tile.  All Glazed floor tiles have been rated at manufacturing stage for the performance of glaze for resistance to wear and scratching using the ‘Porcelain Enamel Institute (PEI) scale.  We always find out this rating before importing and selling any tile.

What is a PEI Rating?

This is an international rating for glazed floor tiles to rate the performance of the glaze resistance to wear and scratching.  The scale (see below), ranges from 1 (least durable) to 5 (most durable).

PEI 1 – Very Light Traffic – These tiles can be used on all indoor wall applications, interior light use counter tops such as in  bathrooms, etc and very light traffic residential bathroom floors.  These tiles are not recommended for any area that will have any constant or heavy foot traffic.

PEI 2 – Light Traffic – These tiles can be used on all interior wall applications.  All interior counter top applications and light traffic residential interior floors.  This tile should not be used for commercial use.

PEI 3 – Moderate Traffic  – These tiles can be used on all interior wall applications, all interior counter tops applications and all residential interior floors.  This tile should not be used for commercial use.

PEI 4 – Moderate to Heavy Traffic – These tiles can be used on all interior wall applications, all interior counter top applications, such as restaurants, lobbies etc.  This tile should not be used for heavy commercial use.

PEI 5 – Heavy Traffic – These tiles can be used on all interior wall applications, all interior counter top applications, all residential interior floors and all heavy commercial applications, such as airports, shopping malls, supermarkets etc.  This tile is an excellent choice for industrial applications where extreme durability is required.

Will a glazed floor tile last a long time?

The durability depends on how the glaze was applied, most glazes should last from 10 to 15 years, however glazes will wear away with heavy traffic.  In general, single glazes are harder and more durable than double glazes. If a glaze shows signs of wear, it can be revived using a specially formulated sealer called LTP Glaze Protector. 

Glazed porcelain and glazed ceramic tiled floors look great when just washed.

Wall Tiles

A part from the standard glazed wall tile the crackle glazed wall tile has become a popular choice.

Are Crackle Glazed tiles hard wearing and do they need sealing?

This is a frequently asked question.  This deliberate crazing effect on a crackle glazed tile has become a popular choice for wall tiles (and can even be seen on original antique tiles (delft range), however to create crackle glazes, the glazed surface is designed to develop a series of spiders web- like cracks.  As a result, crackle glazes are more prone to staining from grout, dirt and water both during and after application.  To protect against this, all crackle glazed tiles should be sealed with LTP Crackle Glaze Sealer prior to installation.  Instruction on sealing crackle glazed tiles(pdf). Take a look at our Greenwood

Crackle Glazed Tiles

Greenwood crackle glaze range. Choice of 5 colours.Parchment, Light Parchment, Fossil, Snowflake and Driftwood

range with a choice of 5 colours.